Kendrick Perkins misses practice to deal with legal trouble stemming from Houston assault

Perkins, of the Oklahoma City Thunder, should be worried enough about the upcoming NBA season, but is in court in Texas as his teammates go through the preseason

Right now, in early October, players around the NBA are either trying to make a team or are coasting along until the regular season begins. For most, now is a pretty stress-free time of the year in which they can get into game shape and get used to new teammates without the concern of losing games that matter in the standings. That's for most players, that is.

Kendrick Perkins doesn't have the ability to say that this time around, as he is stuck dealing with an assault charge in Houston for an incident that occurred over the summer. Instead of lifting weights or attending practices, Perkins is in Texas court as he was accused of punching a woman and her brother, according to KHOU.com via The Oklahoman's Darnell Mayberry.

Both Quincy Alpough, the NBA vet's brother-in-law, and Perkins himself were charged with misdemeanor assault after the car the two were in was involved in a collision and subsequent fight.

Anyway, Perkins probably will just be fined, assigned community service, and given a short probation term for the assault–if found to be guilty–so it probably won't affect his season greatly. However, he clearly isn't the same caliber of player that he was with the Celtics so legal issues like this assault charge certainly won't help him out in terms of winning over the fans, teammates, and coaches that he may have lost with his brutal 2012-13 playoff performance.

If the 28-year-old Perkins–who, according to his age, should have at least a few more good years left in his career–is going to turn around his luck and notoriety in a positive way, he can't be in court in a different state while the rest of his fellow Thunder players ready themselves for a very important season for the franchise. Unacceptable.

About Josh Burton

I'm a New York native who has been a Nets season ticket holder, in both New Jersey and now Brooklyn, for his entire life. Northwestern University (Medill School of Journalism) '18

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