BarclaysCenter_SeatingChart_IslandersvsDevils_v4

Brooklyn secures the Nets, could the Islanders be next?

(NY Islanders Barclays Center’s Seating Chart thanks to the blog – Islanders Point Blank)

In a press conference earlier today, the relatively newly minted Brooklyn Nets revealed the new logos for the team. In the event, the franchise’s CEO Brett Yormark explained the origin of the logo and had plenty of early merchandise for sale behind him. The excitement for the team to get started in the new arena is at an all time high. But as the NBA franchise begins to settle into their new home, there are plenty of New Yorkers that are wondering – will the New York Islanders be their roommates?

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Arena developer Bruce Ratner hopes so.

It isn’t a secret that Ratner has expressed his seal of approval for the hockey move. He has declared that the state-of-the-art arena is easily capable to host both basketball and hockey games. The first test to prove this statement will be in September, as the Islanders will be playing the New Jersey Devils at the arena in a preseason game.

If there is anything the Islanders have going for them, it is time. In a society that almost expects an immediate answer, the league and the Islanders have a bit of wiggle room before they have to make a final decision. Their current lease of the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum ends after the 2014-2015 NHL season. If you’re looking for a reaction from NHL commissioner Gary Bettman, you probably won’t find it. The man in charge has played down any question that links the hockey franchise to the new arena. You could argue that since there is a lack of enthusiasm, the National Hockey League has absolutely no plans to use move in if they can help it.

In the end, I sincerely doubt the Islanders would move the Barclay center. The end all, be all reason? Money. With the attendance capacity around 14,500 for hockey, that just isn’t enough seats for league. As the Islanders turn their franchise around for the better, the long term growth plan simply does not fit inside the Brooklyn arena.

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