NFL franchise tag deadline tracker: Who signed, who didn’t?

Friday afternoon was the deadline for NFL players given the franchise tag to sign long-term deals.

Eight players were given the tag in 2016: Denver Broncos linebacker Von Miller, Chicago Bears receiver Alshon Jeffery, Washington Redskins quarterback Kirk Cousins, New York Jets defensive lineman Muhammad Wilkerson, Buffalo Bills offensive tackle Cordy Glenn, Kansas City Chiefs safety Eric Berry, Los Angeles Rams cornerback Trumaine Johnson and Baltimore Ravens kicker Justin Tucker.

Here is how all eight of the franchise tag negotiations ended up on Friday:

Signed new deals

EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ - SEPTEMBER 28:   Muhammad Wilkerson #96 of the New York Jets reacts during their game against the Detroit Lions at MetLife Stadium on September 28, 2014 in East Rutherford, New Jersey.  (Photo by Ron Antonelli/Getty Images)

EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ – SEPTEMBER 28: Muhammad Wilkerson #96 of the New York Jets reacts during their game against the Detroit Lions at MetLife Stadium on September 28, 2014 in East Rutherford, New Jersey. (Photo by Ron Antonelli/Getty Images)

Cordy Glenn, Buffalo Bills: The first player to sign, Glenn and Bills agreed to a five-year, $65 million deal back in early May. The extension included $36 million guaranteed, and will keep Glenn in Buffalo through the 2020 season.

Von Miller, Denver Broncos: Negotiations were tumultuous at times, but the Super Bowl MVP eventually got his monster deal. The two sides agreed to a six-year, $114.5 million deal on Friday. Miller’s deal provides $70 million guaranteed, including a $23 million signing bonus. Miller had threatened to sit out the 2016 season, but Friday’s deal ensures the Broncos will have their offense-wrecking pass-rusher on the field for many seasons to come.

Muhammad Wilkerson, New York Jets: Few expected Wilkerson to get a new deal from the Jets, but the  two sides pulled it off. Wilkerson’s deal is worth $85 million over five years, or $17 million per season. Of the $85 million, $54 million is guaranteed during the first three years.

Justin Tucker, Baltimore Ravens: A public threat from Tucker helped get a deal done before the deadline. Just one day after stating he’d walk in 2017 without a new deal, Tucker and the Ravens agreed to a four-year, $16.8 million deal. The $10.8 million guaranteed is the most ever for a kicker.

 

No long-term deal

CHICAGO, IL- DECEMBER 13:  Kirk Cousins #8 of the Washington Redskins scores a touchdown during the first quarter against the Chicago Bears on December 13, 2015 at Soldier Field in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by David Banks/Getty Images)

CHICAGO, IL- DECEMBER 13: Kirk Cousins #8 of the Washington Redskins scores a touchdown during the first quarter against the Chicago Bears on December 13, 2015 at Soldier Field in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by David Banks/Getty Images)

Alshon Jeffery, Chicago Bears: Jeffery wanted legitimate No. 1 receiver money, but the Bears weren’t playing ball. Still only 26, Jeffery is only one year removed from back-to-back seasons with over 80 catches and at least 1,100 receiving yards. Injury worries kept Chicago from dishing out the big bucks. Jeffery could set himself up for a huge pay day with a monster 2016 season. He’ll make $14.6 million on the tag.

Kirk Cousins, Washington Redskins: The Redskins played the Cousins situation responsibly. By sticking with the tag and not paying huge dollars over many years to a quarterback with just one year of starting experience, Washington has provided Cousins with a chance to prove he’s actually worth a multiyear, monster deal. “You Like That?” will make $20 million on the tag.

Eric Berry, Kansas City Chiefs: Berry and the Chiefs couldn’t figure out a deal that worked for both sides. Clearly, Kansas City wasn’t comfortable with paying a price similar to the five-year, $51.2 million deal Harrison Smith signed with the Minnesota Vikings. Berry will play the 2016 season on the $10.8 million tag.

Trumaine Johnson, Los Angeles Rams: Johnson has 15 interceptions over four seasons, including an NFC-high seven last season, but he couldn’t squeeze out a big deal from the Rams before the deadline. The 26-year-old cornerback was likely looking for money in the range of former Janoris Jenkins, who signed a five-year, $62.5 million deal with the New York Giants in free agency. He’ll make $13.9 million on the tag in 2016.

Zach Kruse

About Zach Kruse

Zach is the associate editor at The Sports Daily. He also covers the NFL for Bleacher Report and CheeseheadTV.

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