Say goodbye to the extra point (it won’t be missed)

You know why the NFL keeps growing in popularity? A key aspect behind the league's success is that it is continually evolving. Sports that are too stubborn get stuck in the past and lose fans, but the NFL is always fine-tuning the game in order to stay ahead of the competition. 

Just this week, when there was controversy regarding the fact that loose balls and penalties couldn't be reviewed, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell said the league will consider changing that policy.

Goodell also admits that the owners will consider scrapping extra points after touchdowns, which you'd think would be a relief to most football fans. After all, PATs have basically become automatic in recent years. The system Goodell alluded to with NFL Network's Rich Eisen, which would give a team seven points for a touchdown with the option to risk one point in order to gain two, would essentially work the same way it does now…except without a silly formality of a kick afterwards. 

This would, in theory, crack down ever so slightly on injuries (fewer plays means fewer opportunities to get hurt) while also speeding up games (five fewer plays shaves a few minutes off of each game). 

The idea of losing a point after having gained seven is weird, but so was the forward pass when it was implemented. Or the three-point line in basketball. This change wouldn't be nearly as dramatic. And despite what Josh Scobee says, it wouldn't decrease the need for placekickers because field goals aren't going anywhere. 

Change is scary, I know. But it's necessary. Getting rid of extra points would make the NFL a better place. And I promise you'd be used to it in no time. Extra points will soon be a relic. Time to say goodbye to the most useless play in North American professional sports.

Brad Gagnon

About Brad Gagnon

Brad Gagnon has been passionate about both sports and mass media since he was in diapers -- a passion that won't die until he's in them again. Based in Toronto, he's worked as a national NFL blog editor at theScore.com (covering Super Bowls XLIV, XLV and XLVI), a producer and writer at theScore Television Network and a host, reporter and play-by-play voice at Rogers TV. His work has also appeared at Deadspin, FoxSports.com, The Guardian, The Hockey News and elsewhere at Bloguin, but his day gig has him covering all things NFC East for Bleacher Report.

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